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CANINE

DENTAL HEALTH

Routine dental care is a critical component of your pet's oral and overall health, but most pets don't receive the oral hygiene care they need to keep their teeth and gums healthy.  Canine periodontal disease is one of the most common medical conditions seen by veterinarians.  Over 80% of dogs over the age of three have active dental disease.  If left untreated, it will spread to the tooth socket and destroy bone.  It also allows bacteria to travel from the mouth and through the body which can affect the heart, lungs, kidneys, and liver which can result in chronic health issues.

At Carter Veterinary Clinic, Dr. Carter and his team provide complete dental care for your pet. From basics, such as dental exams, teeth cleanings and polishing, to specialty care, which includes dental surgery and extractions, we are here to help ensure your pet's dental health.

Teeth Cleaning, Scaling, and Polishing is $150

Anesthesia and Anesthesia Monitoring is $35

Dental Decayed Tooth Extractions are $10/tooth

Dental Non-Decayed Tooth Extractsion are $50/tooth

Antibiotics may be required after extractions

Post-Procedure Bath/Blowdry - No Charge

 

*Teeth are only extracted if completely necessary for the health and wellness of your dog.  Please read through the information below for more details.

Carter Vet Clinic Recommends Routine Dental Care

CANINE
PERIODONTAL DISEASE

Dr Carter Carter Vet in Douglas Recommends Dental Care

Periodontal disease is a term used to describe infection and associated inflammation of the periodontium, which are the tissues surrounding the teeth.  

 

There are four specific tissues that make up the periodontium:

  • Gums - tissue surrounding the teeth

  • Cementum - covering of root surface inside tooth

  • Periodontic Ligament - attaches tooth to bone

  • Alveolar bone - contains the tooth sockets

Periodontal disease begins with gingivitis, which is caused by plaque and tartar buildup. If left untreated, the infection often spreads deeper into the tooth socket that results in destroying of the alveolar bone.

Let's talk about plaque and tartar buildup....

The mouth is home to thousands of bacteria.  As these bacteria multiply on the tooth's surface, they form an invisible layer called plaque and organize into a biofilm.  In very simple terms, a biofilm is a collection of bacteria structured in such a way as to be very resistant to removal and difficult for antibiotics to access. Some of this plaque is removed naturally by the dog's tongue and chewing habits. However, if allowed to remain on the tooth's surface, plaque thickens and mineralizes resulting in tartar. Tartar is a rough material which attracts more plaque to "stick" to the tooth surface.  Plaque bacteria that comes into contact with the gums can result in inflammation. This inflammation is called gingivitis. Gingivitis is always the first stage of periodontal disease and it is the only truly reversible stage of periodontal disease.  How do you reverse this stage of periodontal disease, you might ask? Dr. Carter and his team perform routine dental exams and cleanings to prevent the onset of periodontal disease. 

ROUTINE DENTAL CLEANING

DOGS BEGIN REQUIRING ANNUAL ROUTINE DENTAL CLEANINGS
BETWEEN THE AGE OF 2-3 YEARS OLD

VETERINARIAN DENTAL EXAMINATION

PRE-ANESTHETIC BLOOD WORK MAY BE REQUIRED

GENERAL ANESTHESIA

DENTAL CLEANING TEETH SCALING
&
POLISHING 

EXTRACTIONS OR SPECIAL APPLICATIONS OF FLUORIDE OR ANTIBIOTICS IF NEEDED

Routine dental cleaning appointments begin by a thorough oral veterinary examination and pre-anesthetic physical assessment. Your pet may require bloodwork to ensure liver and kidney function is optimal for anesthisia. Your pet will then receive general anesthesia, which will be administered throughout the procedure to keep your pet comfortable. A dental hygienist will then perform scaling to remove plaque and tartar buildup on your pet's teeth.  After scaling, the teeth are polished to remove microscopic scratches that occur during scaling.  A smooth surface on the tooth is essential to prevent plaque from easily sticking to the tooth's enamel. Special applications such as fluoride, antibiotic preparations, and cleaning compounds may be indicated to decrease tooth sensitivity, strengthen enamel, treat bacterial infections, and reduce future plaque accumulations.  Should your pet be in the advanced stages of periodontal disease, tooth extraction may also be performed on diseased teeth.

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